A Travellerspoint blog

Onward to Oslo

The long train journey west to see 'The Scream', an Olympic Ski Jump and Viking Longboats

sunny 13 °C
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I had booked myself on the early train for the 6 hour journey to Oslo. This time it was an old train rather than a high speed one like I had from Copenhagen and there was nothing of note during the journey - hours of endless coniferous forests dotted with lakes with the occasional town.

Having booked into my hotel I managed to visit the Nasjonalgalleriet before it closed to tick off one of the items on my Oslo bucket list - too see Edvard Munch's famous 1893 expressionist painting 'The Scream'. Mind you I did looking around the rest of the gallery's collection as well and particularly enjoyed Norwegian Landscapes as well as some of Munch's other works (the gallery had a special Munch Exhibition on so there was rather a lot of them!). On the way back to my hotel I passed a line of electric cars plugged into a public recharging point - not something I can say I have ever come across before.
Edward Munch's 'The Scream' (1893) on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet - the most famous art work in the collection

Edward Munch's 'The Scream' (1893) on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet - the most famous art work in the collection

I particularly liked Johan Christian Dahl's 'Stugunoset pa Filefjell' (1851) but I don't think this photo dringa out the amazing detail of the large herd of deer on the rock lost in the vastness of the landscape

I particularly liked Johan Christian Dahl's 'Stugunoset pa Filefjell' (1851) but I don't think this photo dringa out the amazing detail of the large herd of deer on the rock lost in the vastness of the landscape

Thomas Fearnley's 'The Labro Falls of Kongsberg' on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet

Thomas Fearnley's 'The Labro Falls of Kongsberg' on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet


Erik Werenskiod's 'Peasant Burial' (1885) on display at the Nasjonalgalleriet

Erik Werenskiod's 'Peasant Burial' (1885) on display at the Nasjonalgalleriet

I liked some of Munch's other work, here's 'Rue Lafayette' (1891)

I liked some of Munch's other work, here's 'Rue Lafayette' (1891)

Picasso's 'Guitar and Glass' (1911) on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet

Picasso's 'Guitar and Glass' (1911) on display in the Nasjonalgalleriet

Electric cars plugged into a public recharging point in Central Oslo

Electric cars plugged into a public recharging point in Central Oslo


The next day I decided as in Copenhagen and Stockholm I would get a tourist day pass for Oslo and have an early start to get maximum value from it. First up I ventured 5 miles north on the T-bane (Oslo's Metro) to Holmenkollen, host to the 1952 Winter Olympic Games and 4 World Championships (1930, 1966, 1982 and 2011). Holmekollen is home to the World's oldest ski museum which was interesting, especially how Holmenkollen itself has changed over the years but the star of the show not surprisingly was the Ski Jump itself. From the top the 360° view of Oslo, the Fjord and surrounding forest was spectacular.
The entrance to the Ski Jump and Museum high above Oslofjord at Holenkollen

The entrance to the Ski Jump and Museum high above Oslofjord at Holenkollen

Artifacts from Roald Amundsen's 1911 expedition to the South Pole - yes that is one of the original dogs stuffed!

Artifacts from Roald Amundsen's 1911 expedition to the South Pole - yes that is one of the original dogs stuffed!


Painting of early skiers in the Holmenkollen Ski Museum

Painting of early skiers in the Holmenkollen Ski Museum

Models in the Ski Museum of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump as it was in 1952 and 1982

Models in the Ski Museum of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump as it was in 1952 and 1982


The view going up in the lift to the top of the Ski Jump

The view going up in the lift to the top of the Ski Jump

The view down the Ski Jump from the start at the top

The view down the Ski Jump from the start at the top

Selfie of me at the start of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump

Selfie of me at the start of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump

The spectacular view out the window at the back of the top of the Ski Jump

The spectacular view out the window at the back of the top of the Ski Jump

The spectacular view across Oslofjord from the top of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump

The spectacular view across Oslofjord from the top of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump


Me standing on the top of the medals podium at the very top of the Ski Jump

Me standing on the top of the medals podium at the very top of the Ski Jump


From high above Oslo I made way all the way down to Bygdog, an exclusive fjord side residential area just across the water from Oslo's city centre and home to a number of museums reflecting Norway's cultural history and seafaring traditions. First up was culture with a visit to the open air Norsk Folkesmuseum containing 150+ buildings from all over Norway dating back to the 1500s. The star of the show was definitely the traditional wooden Stave Church built about 1200 and typical of western Norway (I really didn't think I'd get a chance to see one of these) but there were lots of other buildings moved here from all over Norway as well.
The star of the show - the Stave Church built about 1200 and moved here from Gol

The star of the show - the Stave Church built about 1200 and moved here from Gol


Detail from the spire of the Stave Church at the Norsk Folkemuseum

Detail from the spire of the Stave Church at the Norsk Folkemuseum

View of the nave inside the Stave Church

View of the nave inside the Stave Church

There were quite a few old wooden houses from all over Norway

There were quite a few old wooden houses from all over Norway

Another old wooden house at the open air Norsk Folkemuseum

Another old wooden house at the open air Norsk Folkemuseum

A street in Old Town with buildings from the late 19th/early 20th centuries at the Norsk Folkemuseum

A street in Old Town with buildings from the late 19th/early 20th centuries at the Norsk Folkemuseum


1890s counter inside a bank in the Norsk Folkmuseum's old town

1890s counter inside a bank in the Norsk Folkmuseum's old town

Reconstruction of a 1920s Norwegian Petrol Station (although the VW Beetle is from a bit later)

Reconstruction of a 1920s Norwegian Petrol Station (although the VW Beetle is from a bit later)


A recreation of the Norwegian Stortinget (Parliament) meeting chamber as it was in the 19th century

A recreation of the Norwegian Stortinget (Parliament) meeting chamber as it was in the 19th century


It was then on to another item on my Oslo bucket list, the Viking Ships Museum. They are in a cross shaped building with each of the 3 ships having a wing of their own. The are remarkably well preserved, over 90% original timbers and were genuine sea going Viking longboats from the 9th and 10th centuries which were then used to bury individuals of high status - not all viking chiefs were set a drift in burning boats Shetland Valhalla style!Entrance to the Viking Ship Museum

Entrance to the Viking Ship Museum

The Oseberg Ship built around 820, the most ornate of the 3 Viking ships and with pride of place in the museum

The Oseberg Ship built around 820, the most ornate of the 3 Viking ships and with pride of place in the museum


The Gokstad Ship built around 890 and solid enough to sail across the open sea, the largest of the museum's 3 Viking ships

The Gokstad Ship built around 890 and solid enough to sail across the open sea, the largest of the museum's 3 Viking ships


The Tune Ship built around 900, an Ocean going boat but not as well preserved as the other two

The Tune Ship built around 900, an Ocean going boat but not as well preserved as the other two


Me standing by the Oseberg ship at the Vikingskipshuset

Me standing by the Oseberg ship at the Vikingskipshuset


Before my final target for the day I just had time to pop in to the Polar Ship Fram Museum, well I had a valid Oslo Pass so it was free so why not? The Fram was the wooden ship used by the Norwegian polar explorers Nansen (1893-96), Sverdrup (1898-1902) and final Roald Amundsen himself (1910-12). It is credited with having sailed further north and south than any other sailing ship in the world.The Polar Ship Fram used by Roald Amundsen inside its museum at Bygdoy

The Polar Ship Fram used by Roald Amundsen inside its museum at Bygdoy


The deck of the polar ship Fram inside its museum at Bygdoy

The deck of the polar ship Fram inside its museum at Bygdoy


My final port of call was the Kon-Tiki Museum, I remember reading about it when I was a kid. This was the fragile balsa wood raft that Thor Heyerdahl and his five-man crew used to sail from Peru to Easter Island in 1947 to prove that early South Americans could have peopled Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean. Alongside it is the Ra II in which Thor Heyerdahl embarked on a similar trip between Morocco and Barbados in 1970.
A recreation of an Easter Island moai statue outside the Kon-Tiki Museum

A recreation of an Easter Island moai statue outside the Kon-Tiki Museum

The Ra used in That Heyerdahl's1970 Morocco to Barbados Expedition

The Ra used in That Heyerdahl's1970 Morocco to Barbados Expedition

Front view of the Kon-Tiki used in Thor Heyerdahl's 1947 Peru to Easter Island Expedition

Front view of the Kon-Tiki used in Thor Heyerdahl's 1947 Peru to Easter Island Expedition


The Kon-Tiki

The Kon-Tiki


By now it was getting dark and I just had time to take some pictures looking down and across Oslofjord before the sunset. A good day with most of my Oslo bucket list covered, just a leisurely stroll around Oslo city centre planned for tomorrow.
Early evening view over to Oslo from the Bygdog peninsular

Early evening view over to Oslo from the Bygdog peninsular

View of Akershus Festning (Oslo Castle and Fortress) from the Bygdoy peninsular

View of Akershus Festning (Oslo Castle and Fortress) from the Bygdoy peninsular


Evening view down Oslofjord from the Bygdoy peninsular

Evening view down Oslofjord from the Bygdoy peninsular

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Norway

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